Member of the Month

~December~

miguel-ramirez

Miguel D. Ramirez Ph.D.
Department Chair and Ward S. Curran Distinguished Professor of Economics
at Trinity College

For the final month of 2016 we would like to honor a longtime IAES member and conference participant, Dr. Miguel D. Ramirez. We’ve been privileged to have his support for over twenty years and we look forward to what the future may bring. Currently, Dr. Ramirez is the Ward S. Curran Distinguished Professor and Department Chair of Economics at Trinity College. Dr. Ramirez is a native of Chile and has been a naturalized U.S. citizen since 1990, but he keeps his background close to his heart and it’s reflected in his work. His research is primarily dedicated to analyzing the challenges and opportunities that Latin American nations face as they attempt to stabilize and reform their economies in an increasingly globalized world. His passion is evident and why we’re glad to have him represent us as our Member of the Month for the month of December.

Why did you become a member of the International Atlantic Economic Society?:

I became a member of the IAES in the 1980s because, under the leadership and vision of the late John Virgo, it focused its attention on current economic ideas and issues not just from a narrow (reductionist) and parochial perspective, but from an eclectic (institutional) and international dimension.

What do you find most enjoyable about your membership?: 

I enjoy the opportunity to publish my ideas on various economic topics in the high-quality journals sponsored by the IAES, as well as participate and meet colleagues and friends at the various conferences organized by the Society both at home and at several attractive venues abroad.

Have you held any notable positions within the IAES, (Officer, Board of Editiors, Program Committee, etc.) if so, when?:

No, I have not yet had the opportunity and privilege to do so.

What types of projects/research are you working on and what inspired/motivated you to pursue that interest?: 

Given my Chilean background, my research is primarily dedicated to analyzing the challenges and opportunities that Latin American nations face as they attempt to stabilize and reform their economies in an increasingly globalized world. In recent years, I have focused on the economic and institutional determinants of foreign direct investment in Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and Hungary, as well as the impact of these flows on private capital formation and labor productivity growth. Another important focus of my work in recent years has been the growing role of remittance flows in financing private investment spending and boosting economic growth in countries such as Ecuador, the Dominican Republic, and Mexico. Finally, I have and continue to pursue a long-time interest of mine by delving into the history of economic thought by critically analyzing Marx’s important analysis of wages and cyclical crises, his theory of absolute and differential rent, and his controversial writings on the so-called Asiatic mode of production.

What advice would you give to someone who is considering entering your line of work/field of study?: 

I would advise them to select a line of work or study that you’re really passionate about because, without that drive and interest, you will not be willing to put in the required effort and countless hours of work necessary to succeed.  

Favorite hobby: 

I am an avid runner and have run the Boston Marathon six times.

 

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